Domain Manage

DRS consultation - outcome

Discussion in 'Domain Name Disputes' started by bb99, Jul 4, 2007.

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  1. bb99 United Kingdom

    bb99 Well-Known Member

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  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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  3. olebean

    olebean Well-Known Member

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    I agreed

    Although tomorrow I am doubtful we will be any the wiser

    Cuius est solum eius est usque ad coelum et ad inferos :twisted:
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
  4. sneezycheese

    sneezycheese Active Member

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    Shocking reading - £10 for a complainant to 'have a pop' and as a result having a 70% chance of winning the domain by default - sickening! :shock:

    And that's not all... :cry:
     
  5. tifosi United Kingdom

    tifosi Well-Known Member

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    cheaper than dropcatching. And the stats are better.
     
  6. retired_member6

    retired_member6 Banned

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    Well £10 is better than it being free... but is the £750 still in place when a domain holder responds?

    Lee
     
  7. grantw United Kingdom

    grantw Well-Known Member

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    So am I right in thinking that if I pay £10 and initiate a DRS on a domain and my main argument is 'I want it because its a nice domain' and the owner doesnt respond I can then pay £200 and get the domain transfered !?!

    Grant
     
  8. njf United Kingdom

    njf Active Member

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    Anyone see what would stop the technique:

    1. Find an attractive domain where contacts are out of date/owner does not respond to contact [mineable - existing domains becoming Suspended would indicate the owner is AWOL, you then try and contact to buy nice-domain and get nothing in reply],

    2. You file a £10 DRS with a view to getting a default xfer,

    3. You obtain default transfer as no response from Registrant (would any evidence be required?)

    The default-transfer mandated process, without an expert to regulate, might cause a lot of prospective £10 DRS cases - common sense would throw them out - but how are they dealt with in the proposed process?

    Hoping I am missing something simple, or has it not been thought through?
     
  9. sneezycheese

    sneezycheese Active Member

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    ...exactly!

    £210 for a 70% chance of getting some prime generics - nice :rolleyes:

    It's an easy way also to have a go at crippling your competitor for a tenner for at least a month if they don't reply, or in time! :twisted:
     
  10. retired_member6

    retired_member6 Banned

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    I don't understand, it's £200 if there's no response... £100 if the domain goes to default and the domain holder wishes to show they never got forms and wish to fight, domain holder pays £100... so how much if the defendent responds?

    Still £200? so the price of domains just fell £550, nominet is out to wipe many low domainers out. Nominet set the barrier figure of resale domains at £750 and whilst knocking out deleting have just lowered the bar to £200... nice.

    Lee
     
  11. retired_member6

    retired_member6 Banned

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    Revised. Pay a tenner, get no response, pay £200 for the domain and a decision which if you can claim good enough rights it's then yours for £200. Someone clearly aint got a danny on how this all works (probably me), this decision, if correct is as stupid as the persons who closed deleting!

    It can't be right, maybe someone who understands English can write out the document including what stands and what's gone. I think the £750 still stands, it's got to, the £200 is just for the default transfer. Any other way is sheer madness. I'm going to bed, I'll read it in the morning as I've clearly misread it.

    The proper detailed new format arrives in August, debate until then... appeal fees still stand at £3000? so the £750 has to remain. Before I go, yes pay £10, no response, get a domain for £200 after bad decision - so hit a pro domainer very hard with 1000 requests, then pick whatever your want as you know they aint got a chance of fighting them all at once, then clean up and resell directly after.

    Lee
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
  12. sneezycheese

    sneezycheese Active Member

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    ...Pay a tener - respondant doesn't reply - pay £200 for the default transfer - wait a month (still no reply) and 'hey presto' it's yours! :rolleyes:
     
  13. retired_member30

    retired_member30 Retired Member

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    And the response deadlines are unaltered! Take a three week break and come back to find your best domains are someone elses at just £210 a time - even though they may have no right to the domain - apart from good timing with the DRS. Am I missing something :confused: Be good to hear Beasty's insight into this.
     
  14. retired_member6

    retired_member6 Banned

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    There still has to be the rights issue for a transfer and the decision costs £200, so even if you have a lightweight domain when it comes to TM or other use, the barrier for resale gets lowered, but if you respond it's still £750, it has to be.

    The IP lawyers are winning the battle, they're going to gain major business out of this, sell the £200 concept, reap £2000 in contractual fees for doing the work on each domain. They could scour for business as soon as August so watch out and if they find multiple clients in amongst your multiple domain holdings, they could hit you with ten at a time for £10 each, then go after the £200 release fee. There's holes all over the place in this, a domainer will get hit hard at some point. Gauranteed and if they don't, why not? Opportunity knocks.

    Gone.

    Lee
     
  15. scooter United Kingdom

    scooter Well-Known Member

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    There is no mention of the original fee of £750 in the new proposals.

    The way I read it, it is a straight £10 and you are off to DRS. If the respondant does not reply, you can get the name by default for an extra £200.

    If the respondant does reply, you await the outcome from the expert but there is no more cost involved.

    Or am I wrong?

    .
     
  16. retired_member12

    retired_member12 Retired Member

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    A major shift in the domainer model. Dropcatching will clearly become less important in certain respects, especially as research techniques develop.

    The researchers amongst us will have a field day, especially for domains where the owner is difficult to trace.

    I see some fantastic opportunities/rewards for those willing to put the effort in! It certainly puts a ball in the court of those who are not dropcatching-savvy, and you'll end up with more that just two people grabbing the best domains all the time!
     
  17. scooter United Kingdom

    scooter Well-Known Member

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    So is it just a £10 fee and you're off to DRS with no further fees incurred?

    (unless they don't respond and then you can get it for £200)


    Can someone please clarify this.



    .
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2007
  18. fred United Kingdom

    fred Active Member

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    No, as I read it:

    You Pay £10 with initial "complaint"
    If a responce is recieved, you can pay the £750 to take it to an expert.
    If no responce is made, you can pay £200 to get a 'default transfer'

    If a default transfer is done, and the respondant then decides to respond, they can reopen the case for £100.
     
  19. olebean

    olebean Well-Known Member

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    Agreed..

    The process to start a DRS has become easier. What concerns me is the lack of greater commitment of secondary market and the suggestion of "reflecting" english law. Then you have the usual individual who is dead against extending rights heading up the overseeing committee.. I wonder has he changed his mind?
     
  20. scooter United Kingdom

    scooter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks. So it is actually costing them £10 more as at present it is free to raise the complaint and go to mediation.

    Out of curiosity, has anyone here that has gone to mediation over a name they know they will loose, offered to sell the name to the complainant at mediation stage?

    (EG: pointing out they can save £250 by settling now for £500)

    .
     
  21. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Usually I choose to stay out of the fray when it comes to Nominet policy changes, but this time is different.

    The idea that an entity can pay 10 pounds to file a challenge and, should the owner of the domain they're challenging not respond within the very short delay allowed (overseas post alone can take 1 week+ each way!) then they win the right to take the domain for 200 pounds without even having the actual substance of the complaint considered is on the face of it palpably ridiculous, yet having re-read the DRS consultation document several times it still stubbornly seems to say exactly that.

    So the new process could be:-

    1) Choose a "desirable" domain name to "bounty hunt" (e.g. one where the ownership is in the name of a defunct company or a non-traceable individual)
    2) Pay 10 pounds and file anything you like ("My old man's a dustman" for example) since if the owner doesn't respond the content of the filing itself is irrelevant.
    3) If the owner doesn't answer, pay 200 quid and hold your breath for a month
    4) Win the domain name and hold your breath for a month
    5) Congratulations, you've just heisted a very valuable domain. Time to wash, rinse, repeat

    You could even use the process (in theory) to attempt attacks against larger sites such as ecommerce sites etc. - at just 10 pounds a pop, you could fire DRS attempts at a whole slew of sites until you get to one where the IT department happened to mess up the updating of the domain contact, the mail gets lost en route, etc. and bang, they're "suddenly" (from their point of view - they were none the wiser about the filing of the complaint) switched off as the domain is suspended.

    I sincerely hope someone from Nominet is reading this thread and can see the madness in the above in time to steer the ship away from the iceberg!
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2007
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