Domain Manage

Hyphen domains

Discussion in 'Domain Research' started by AuthorityDomain, Apr 22, 2013.

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  1. AuthorityDomain United States

    AuthorityDomain Active Member

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    I'm sure this question has been asked before, but I wanted to find out if anyone is having much success with selling hyphenated domains to end users at the moment. Single hyphen .co.uk mainly

    Would appreciate any feedback as it may help with a future purchase for a quick flip if possible.

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2013
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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  3. namealot United Kingdom

    namealot Well-Known Member

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    If demand is there for product, service, geo etc, No reason for them not to sell especially if all other combinations non, cctlds, TLDS, plural, singular etc are regged and developed harder if there not? ( unless the owners of the non want silly money ) Price is a different thing altogether?
     
  4. AuthorityDomain United States

    AuthorityDomain Active Member

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    Thanks for the feedback namealot

    For reg fee I think its worth the punt, just my time that will be the cost
     
  5. Bailey United Kingdom

    Bailey Well-Known Member

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    I personally wouldn't take them as a second choice (at anytime) that's a bit like going down the minor extension route.

    It's got to be where the hyphen makes some sort of constructive sense, either because it's a natural assumption to the word presentation (Usually dictionary presented) or it's really required to make coherent sense.

    The only other reason would be to protect a non-hyphenated registration.

    Can't ever recall seeing them as a 'worthwhile' domain sale/purchase outside of those parameters.

    It all down to natural (keyboard) input characteristics, the hyphen requires a 'focused' input. and Domain requirements deleted the spacebar, and we've learnt to live with it
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2013
  6. Systreg

    Systreg Well-Known Member

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    @ Bailey, I think it's very narrow minded saying that adding a hyphen is like going down the minor extension route.

    There's nothing wrong with hyphens, I don't mind them at all, and you only need to look at how many businesses use them to see they have a use, businesses seem to like having a hyphen to seperate words, and it seems they would rather buy the hyphenated than pay a big price for the non hyphenated.

    Incidentally, I sold a .co.uk payday name with 2 hyphens today on Sedo for £400
     
  7. Bailey United Kingdom

    Bailey Well-Known Member

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    Systreg - It's a matter of opinion, and with all due respect It was in direct response to the question posted of value of hyphenated domains, I'm not saying they can't ever sell. Of course Businesses want and associate with the best fit. (from their perspective)

    I don't consider my advised direction 'Narrow-minded' -But, purely trying to be all encompassing.
     
  8. wizard

    wizard Well-Known Member

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    I have to agree with Systreg nothing wrong with hyphens.
     
  9. Bailey United Kingdom

    Bailey Well-Known Member

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    I will stay with this question purely because we get to influence those that are new to domains and see ol'boys postings as carte' blanche

    So lets dig it deep.

    Hyphen domains do not sell - end of, Sure there is examples to be had, those that promote them are usually owners of (likewise) portfolios . I agree totally with the argument that that there isn't a good reason not to identify the strongest of terms as hyphenated, then reconsider, if the domain market isn't active in this sector - why should that be ?

    It sure would take a very good argument to take them as an investment even in .com - but maybe .co.uk investors know better
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
  10. namealot United Kingdom

    namealot Well-Known Member

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    Seen many arguments that verbally - don’t work? Just as many visually they do? Those pushing them have a vested interest? Same vested interest as those that don’t? The abundance of poor multiple hyphen sites although ditto could be said of non hyphenated.

    Look at the un- more often there not developed indexed on g, parked for years, dodgy masking / forwarding affiliate type, if it’s domainers even better as its hopefully priced so only real buyers are end user big company…?

    The - can be real gem If the un- is the above this makes it easy to list the – above it (yes the un- may grab it back when developed that could be years) meanwhile your grabbing sales, building a business potential buyers for the non are seeing yours first even if they decide to go un- the new owner has no choice but too fight against or buy chances are they’ll be paying a lot more than reg fee...? to a newbie I'd say research research research - or not Reg names that you can monertise....
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2013
  11. cm1975 United Kingdom

    cm1975 Well-Known Member

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    Over 50% of my end user sales in the last 12 months have been hyphenated, but then a large proportion of my domains are hyphenated, so it's only natural!

    For the right words, they sell, for the wrong words, they don't.

    I'm not here to convince anyone, as I don't look to sell on here as much these days.
     
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