Domain Manage

Letter of offer, should I reply....

Discussion in 'Domain Name Disputes' started by 4ndy, Oct 1, 2010.

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  1. 4ndy United Kingdom

    4ndy Active Member

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    Hi

    Please can you help.

    Ive had a letter from someone wanting to purchase one of my domain names asking how much I would sell for.

    If i reply to this letter with my price expectations could the buyer then use this letter as proof in anyway for putting a case against me for registering the domain in bad faith.

    The domain in question is a possible mixture of trademark/generic.

    Cheers
    Andy
     
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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  3. Pred United Kingdom

    Pred Well-Known Member

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    whos the letter from?

    companies sometimes use this tactic via email, as especially anyone 'can' have a 'misleading' email adress as particularly with google and yahoo, most names are gone

    however i would say in my humble opinion if someone is writing you a letter and pretending to be someone else, thats deceitful in the first place (possibly illegal?) . so a written letter imo would show more willing

    if the letter is from a company and your domain is possibly infringeing then its 50/50

    they may have written as one of the problems with .uk domains it can be bloody hard to find easy contact details for people and writing is last option, as can't find email

    can you tell us more without revealing name or company.........
     
  4. DaveBeasley United Kingdom

    DaveBeasley Nominet Member

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    Have they left a contact tel no. in their letter? you could always ring them back, saves leaving them with documented evidence, if not, I normally just ignore any first contact, but either keep a mental note of the letter or email and wait to see if they make contact again some time later, just to see if they're just tyre kickers or are serious about acquiring it.

    Alternaively tell them its not for sale and will be developed shortly, that usually flushes them out of hiding if they think they cant get it straightforwardly. All depends on whether you 'actually' want to sell it...

    Dave
     
  5. foz

    foz Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    If they really wanted it, an offer would be forthcoming in the first instance.

    Solicitors use untraceable letters and email addresses. Their personal name maybe real but the intention behind this is to draw bad faith response(s) out of you.

    Leave well alone would be my stance.
     
  6. Skinner

    Skinner Well-Known Member

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    If there is ANY and I do mean ANY possible infringement of any rights of any company with an exact name and you value the domain over mid-xxx, ignore it or reply with sorry not interested and see if they make an offer.

    I use the mid-xxx range as its often cheaper to pay you the xxx than go the full DRS route as solicitors time is money as is a drs. Unless your bang out on a limb when a summary decision could be called.
     
  7. James United Kingdom

    James Active Member

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    Tell them that you are not actively looking to sell the domain name at this time, however if they wanted to take discussions further you would be open to discussions on a "without prejudice basis".

    I've had just this sort of entrapment used on me in the past. You can look up the Oasis.com UDRP if you want a good read :)

    On the other hand if your domain name is a blatant typo, you should do the sensible thing.
     
  8. Bailey United Kingdom

    Bailey Well-Known Member

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    That says just about everything, unless you predate their TM which I doubt.

    So to rephrase your question you registered A tradeMarked domain name with a generic descriptive of the trademark holders goods or services, because thats how it reads.

    Please tell me I'm wrong
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2010
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