Would you include a copy of the lease agreement when contacting endusers?

Discussion in 'Domains For Rent' started by nparkin0, Jul 3, 2011.

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  1. nparkin0

    nparkin0 (4) Active Member Known Trader

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    Hi all,

    This may be a question asked before but i've had a search around and I cannot find anything, so sorry in advance if there is.

    Basically, I am in the process of putting together a letter to contact end-users regarding a domain I own. I have decided to offer them the chance of leasing the domain and purchase.

    My question is: Would you include a copy of the lease agreement with the sales letter or do you think this is a little pushy and perhaps say you can send one if they are interested?

    I am legally qualified so have no problem with the construction of the lease itself, I am just wondering whether including the lease would put some people off from the outset.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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  3. brum

    brum (74) Active Member Trusted Trader

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    u want them to read the letter , if the lease is there they maybe overwhelmed and think it will be to complicated. i would probabaly have a heads of terms though basically giving the basics of the deal to them. then when they contact you can send over the full lease agreement once they have decided they want to go ahead then all you have to do is negotiatiate the clauses rather than the whole deal.

    but i've not tried it so i would split test . the only real way of knowing .

    good luck
     
  4. nparkin0

    nparkin0 (4) Active Member Known Trader

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    Thank Brum, I didn't think of split testing. At least then I would be able to monitor the response.

    I think you are right - giving the basics is probably the right way to go, some people may be totally overfaced in the beginning and just throw the lot in the bin.
     
  5. namealot United Kingdom

    namealot (6) Well-Known Member Known Trader

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    The simpler it is the better? They don’t want to waste there time reading legal stuff they would unlikely know if it was right or wrong or good or bad or have to pass to there legal team, If they think at the start they'd have to employ someone to make sure the contract is ok then you could scare them off before they start...

    Include whatever research sales patter you have for the domain name buy all means. For the name itself its best to just say for its available for sale, lease, sponsorship agreement etc then let them approach you...
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2011
  6. accelerator United Kingdom

    accelerator (44) Well-Known Member Trusted Trader

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    I don't think I would, instead I would focus on selling the benefits of the domain to them. The lease agreement is unnecessary at the initial stage.

    Were you going to include the cost of leasing?

    Rgds
     
  7. nparkin0

    nparkin0 (4) Active Member Known Trader

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    I was going to include the cost (which to be honest is picked out of my head, but for the industry is not a stupid amount) - but I was going to mention that I am willing to negotiate.

    Do you think think is sensible?

    I think the not including the lease route seems to be the right way to go as you have all mentioned.
     
  8. wb United Kingdom

    wb (34) Well-Known Member Trusted Trader

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    Would agree with not including the lease agreement.

    As soon as you put you are willing to negotiate, nobody is likely to pay the price you are asking for. If it seems a reasonable price at the moment and you want to receive that amount and use the 'negotiation welcome' strategy, then perhaps increase it to make anyone making an offer feel they have got a deal (everyone likes to feel as if they've gotten a bargain).
     
  9. Edwin

    Edwin (73) Well-Known Member Trusted Trader

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    I wonder if you could use your legal skills to craft a document that is short, easy to understand (plain English!) yet also covers all the necessary bases for a "safe" leasing arrangement.

    It might then actually help cement the deal if the potential leasee is left with a 1-side-of-A4-maximum, simple contract that they can read and absorb in a few minutes, and then they just need to sign it and return it to you for the lease to start...
     
  10. bensd United Kingdom

    bensd (135) Well-Known Member Exclusive Member Trusted Trader

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    IMO there are going to be a few more emails in between before the sign an agreement.

    Therfore, IMO I wouldn't include the lease agreement. It might be worth listing the main points of a typical lease ie. price, lenght, buy out option etc.
     
  11. wb United Kingdom

    wb (34) Well-Known Member Trusted Trader

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    Another point to remember is that if you're contacting multiple end users and attaching lease agreements, it's going to cause avoidable complications if (or when) more than one entity wants it, and they all return you a signed contract...
     
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