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10yr history domain, value?

Discussion in 'Domain Appraisals' started by pbryd, Feb 26, 2012.

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  1. pbryd United Kingdom

    pbryd Active Member

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    I've stumbled across a domain which is free to reg.

    Web.archive.org shows a 10yr history selling kitchens and furniture.

    The domain is

    [generic word]kitchens.co.uk

    It's not something you'd search for but could be brandable I suppose.

    Does the history of the domain give it some value despite if being FTR.
     
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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  3. anthony United Kingdom

    anthony Well-Known Member

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    Most would argue no, apart from the 'natural' value certain terms might have, whether there is history or not.

    Google has become very savvy at stripping all PR from a .uk very shortly after it goes to suspended status, certainly I've noticed this in a sample of 71,000 .co.uk & .org.uk domains I've monitored PR of for 6 years. It does raise two points though:

    1- Can all that goodwill be reconstructed by a new registrant? It's been suggested loads of times, but unless you copy the old site verbatim, then it's just as likely the new content is as responsible for any renewed ranking as anything else.

    2- Does allowing your site to slip into suspended status, even for a few weeks, do lasting damage? Let's just say that for those 'real' sites that have been rescued from suspension, it's not worth the risk of allowing your hard-ranked domain even go there in the first place. Better to renew early than take the chance!
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2012
  4. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Which is illegal, unless you have the explicit permission of the previous site's owner. Copyright doesn't expire when a site goes dark. It lasts for 70 years from when the content was first published, and it makes no difference that it was on the web rather than in print...
    http://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/copyright/questions
     
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