Domain Manage

Avoiding Paypal Problems

Discussion in 'Domain Name Scams' started by HariSeldon, Jan 26, 2010.

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  1. HariSeldon

    HariSeldon Active Member Exclusive Member

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    We accept PayPal for smaller sales and are occasionally asked if we'll accept PayPal for larger ones too but so far we've always declined such offers.

    PayPal state that a Buyer must start a dispute within 45 days and a claim within 20 days of that making a time limit of 65 days in total.

    With that in mind can anyone think of any problems if we went ahead with such sales but didn't start the domain transfer until outside this 65 day limit?

    Obviously it's not ideal for the buyer as the whois won't be updated during this period but we could of course update the DNS which is the main thing for most people.

    Anyone got any thoughts on this?
     
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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  3. GreyWing

    GreyWing Retired Member

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    If they really wanted to buy it then they would wait however and make do with nameserver changes, a better alternative all round is usually escrow with buyer and seller covering the costs.

    The chargebacks is one big reason why I only deal in .uk's
     
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  4. HariSeldon

    HariSeldon Active Member Exclusive Member

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    That was my thoughts too that if they were serious then why wouldn't you wait so long as they had a working email/web site while waiting.

    I can envisage genuine reasons for them wanting to use PayPal, there are people out there who use PayPal as their online business account, and for others it allows them to effectively pay for a domain with a credit card.

    I too only sell .uk, something I've wondered about is whether Nominet offer any support to Registrars in the case of non-payers/fraud?
     
  5. grantw United Kingdom

    grantw Well-Known Member

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    Use sedo escrow, the buyer can pay by credit card/paypal/bank transfer and it's about the same cost as paypal at 3%.

    Grant
     
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  6. HariSeldon

    HariSeldon Active Member Exclusive Member

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    Thanks to you both, having now looked into it, Sedo Escrow seems to be the way to go.

    There's an additional 3% fee for PayPal sales over $500 making 6% in total but I'd be happy splitting this with the buyer and so long as the buyer agrees it's a no-brainer all round.
     
  7. FC Domains

    FC Domains Well-Known Member

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    I've never had any problems and have always assumed that as domain names are intangible goods, they are excluded from claims.
     
  8. droid United Kingdom

    droid Active Member

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    I am under the impression that they are excluded too, unless there is a direct CC chargeback which Paypal tend to buckle to.

    I have been using Paypal as a primary payment source since 2002, several thousands of transactions later and I have had two chargebacks, both for less than £10 over that time. (I hope that hasn't tempted fate now)

    Gary
     
  9. fred United Kingdom

    fred Active Member

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    I claimed once for a domain purchase when the seller didn't transfer the (uk) domains. The seller didn't respond to any of the claim process and they found in my favour, but as the sellers account no longer had the money in it they couldn't (wouldn't?) refund. They did however lock the sellers account which caused me to get a refund in the end!
     
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