20i Domains

Unrealistic User Valued Domains

Discussion in 'Domain Research' started by markb, Feb 3, 2011.

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  1. markb United Kingdom

    markb Active Member

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    The "B" is personal to myself, and no its not my surname. I have changed my avatar now. Hopefully some people should be able to tell us apart now.

    Thanks
    Mark
     
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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    articles.co.uk
     
  3. Bailey United Kingdom

    Bailey Well-Known Member

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    Thats a pretty unique perspective you have their richrf. domains are speculative , which is 90% of the attraction for those that believe they can operate in that environment.
     
  4. richrf

    richrf Active Member

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    That is fine as long as you understand even the greatest business people have a difficult time achieving long term gains greater than 10%. If they do, there is usually some gimmick (also called a scam) a la Madoff.
     
  5. richrf

    richrf Active Member

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    Domain development, like land development, can be speculative (by definition a limited chance for success) or more predictable. The more predictable the lower returns. Every business model has its pros and cons and each individual can choose where on the spectrum they would like to be. The most successful people that I know are tortoises who just grind out their returns. However, I have known speculators who are (were) very successful. Some use methods that I wouldn't use. Others are dead from the stress.
     
  6. websaway United Kingdom

    websaway Well-Known Member

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    The example you use of 50k is not related to anything specific, so difficult to be objective.

    But lets say If you offered £1,000,000 for a house, you could well think look, I am offering you 1million pounds, this is a lot of money, but if the house is worth 3 million pounds the person is not going to sell, what your million pounds is to you ( or in your case 50k ) is a matter for you, the price the house seller or in this case the domain owner puts on their asset is a matter for them, If you can meet in the middle all well and good but domain owners like house sellers are prefering to hang on to their valuables until the right offer comes along or the time is right to do something else with them.
    Also worth considering is the difference between house prices in a not so desirable part of a northern City and the house prices in a very desirable part of London, it's vast, some people can't get their head around that and likewise with domain names, some people just don't get it.
     
  7. wb

    wb Well-Known Member

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    Equally though the house, or domain in this case, may not be worth that much at all and the offer received may have been a realistic/good one which the domain owner will never receive again. Let's not forget the basics here. Things are only worth what the next person is willing to pay.

    There aren't that many domains worth high five or six figures, and it's a shame to see some nice dormant domains which are overvalued and may never be used (shame for both buyers making realistic offers, and for sellers who could be losing out on thousands of pounds).

    At the end of the day it all comes down to risk, most of us will have different opinions which is part of the fun. :)
     
  8. markb United Kingdom

    markb Active Member

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    Thanks for all your comments, I think that what it all boils down to is that with a house or car, they are quite easy to value, as their are many similar ones out there, therefore a more accurate value can be placed on them, and the value usually comes from an expert in their field, i.e. an estate agent.

    With most domain names, it is hard to put avalue on them, as they are all different, plus most valuations are made up by the domain owner and not usually experts in the field.

    Obviously with anything that someone is trying to sell, as the seller you are going to try to get the most money for it, and as the buyer you want it as cheap as possible.

    Mark
     
  9. richrf

    richrf Active Member

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    I think it is less a function of experts making an appraisal and more a function of the fact that there is lack of information to make an appraisal with. Here in the U.S. most residential real estate is sold through the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) so price discovery is fairly easy. There are no similar clearinghouses when it comes to domains. So each person, including experts, have to come up with some set of variables that they will use to price a given domain.

    I talked to many experts when attempting to price my premium domain (it is very high valued) and no one had a clue as to how to price it so they simply asked what did I want for it? I think that this will probably remain an issue for some time to come since their is no clear way to classify domains and track their history (something that the Case-Schiller Report does for home prices in the U.S.). So, it will remain more like selling jewelery (which is also subject all kinds of variables and shenanigans) than selling real estate.
     
  10. websaway United Kingdom

    websaway Well-Known Member

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    The chances are though that if he drops the price to 1 million pounds you would get killed in the rush, in turn pushing the price up.

    Yes, your right there are not many domains in the high five or six figure bracket and that's why they are so precious, hence holding up values, and remember from a corporate perspective there is a lot of money that could be allocated to these names, and often the buyer forgets the massive market there is for a name, he sometimes thinks he's the only person interested in the name in the world. There are exceptions of course but the people with the best names normally know their market and the value of their names.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2011
  11. urbanvilla

    urbanvilla Active Member

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    It's simple really......It all depends on how much the seller needs the money depends on the price in my experience !
     
  12. Bailey United Kingdom

    Bailey Well-Known Member

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    Nicely put.

    No slur intended on those that operate their domain names in a stamp-collection fashion. forever swapping, buying at £15 here selling at $25 there. Reading some of the outright requests for "positive trader feedback" for mentioning an available unregistered domain - tells you there is a bit of "facebook" friend collecting mentality - But Hey "what-ever floats your boat" .

    I can't imagine for one minute that those that have delt successfully with domains for any length of time aren't extremely grateful for the opportunity or have any great motivation to plaster their story all over the net either.

    And those that are doing ok - it still can be an ongoing learning exercise. Thats the whole point in any type of enterprise, If it were that simple everyone and their mother would be at it, but it isin't and they aren't.

    The real tragedy in domains and indeed development is those that don't learn from their mistakes or know how to attribute their successes. Some of the comments made you learn to identify with those that haven't been around for that long - Nothing wrong with that we all started somewhere. I just quietly laugh when they're presented as points of fact.

    The individuals that consistently over-price their domains tend to be those that have gone with the wrong type of domain in the first place, ie their whole model is not substainable. Self delusion (at the outset) about why a domain has value or indeed where it's outlet is likely to be, is part of the learning curve. and should be in all our history at some point in time.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2011
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