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Wordpress or hard code ?

Discussion in 'SEO Search Engine Optimisation' started by dee, Mar 1, 2017.

  1. dee

    dee Well-Known Member Acorn Supporter

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    Hi All,

    Is there and real advantage in usung a CMS such as wordpress over plain old html on a mini site ? Say for example I have a domain for a well known venue. Im aiming to do a mini site with info/ history / seating plan etc . If the content is relatively static is wordpress overkill ? It means i dont have to worry about SQL etc and updates.
     
  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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    articles.co.uk
     
  3. amfletchers United Kingdom

    amfletchers Active Member

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    Wordpress sites used to be looked on VERY favourably by Google but I no longer think this is the case. I'd go with plain old html.
     
  4. dee

    dee Well-Known Member Acorn Supporter

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    Really ? There was a preference ? Based on seo out of the box do you think ?
     
  5. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    All other things being well, plain HTML should load much quicker, especially if you write lean HTML, embed CSS etc. It's also more secure (nothing to hack) and should be easier to SEO as you have 100% granular control over every tag and element. Finally, it's more portable: you can chuck HTML on any hosting platform, and move a site in minutes...
     
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  6. RobM

    RobM Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Wordpress is bloated and the umpteen hundreds of plugins that people add without removing non-used plugins only bloat it further, make it slower, and decrease it's already appalling security. I recommend it to people with no html knowledge. I wouldn't however recommend anyone hosting a site for anyone else to ever have this POS software within 100 miles of their server :p
     
  7. dee

    dee Well-Known Member Acorn Supporter

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    Totally makes sense. Thats what i thought, just wanted to make sure i wasnt missing something.

    Thanks. Job done. Wordpress....get your coat and leg it
     
  8. TallBloke

    TallBloke Active Member

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    If you go with wordpress you do get the option to expand the site easily if you want to. You could include a news blog for the venue and allow comments for instance.

    Personally I don't find wordpress too much of a chore to maintain so I stick with it.
     
  9. dee

    dee Well-Known Member Acorn Supporter

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    WIth that in mind and while I think of it . You know of any better CMS options ? Ive thought of trying my own using php includes or something simple.
     
  10. TallBloke

    TallBloke Active Member

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    That's not so much a problem with wordpress, more the users who install all the guff.
     
  11. TallBloke

    TallBloke Active Member

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    Don't know if they're any better but off the top my head there's drupal, ghost, perch
     
  12. RobM

    RobM Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    True the holes in wordpress have mostly been solved. However the users *couldn't* install all the guff if they weren't using it. If you can install plugins at the click of a button then it is inevitable that people will do that without any thought about where the plugin originated, who wrote it, and how reliable it was. Therefore no wordpress = no aggro. Also wordpress sites are easily spotted and although they may look ok for casual content I don't think they instil much confidence in a serious site with serious products.
     
  13. amfletchers United Kingdom

    amfletchers Active Member

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    Back in the day there was for sure. Now Wordpress isn't what Google is really looking for (super fast mobile sites) in most cases.

    I love the Ghost blogging system. I've been trying it out on a project I've been working on - seedsaving .co.uk

    Still think HTML/Css is a good option for a site that isn't updated often though!
     
  14. amfletchers United Kingdom

    amfletchers Active Member

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    Also, is it just me but I'm finding it hard to find a really nice Wordpress theme? They seem stuck in the design of 10 years ago. I just wish Medium.com was better for self hosted sites and more familiar in the UK as their design is just the best I have seen.
     
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  15. dazc United Kingdom

    dazc Active Member

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    For a relatively static site Bootstrap works pretty well across any platform.
     
  16. atlas Canada

    atlas Well-Known Member

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    Like this site that is using Wordpress:

    https://nominet.uk/wp-admin
     
  17. RobM

    RobM Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    That's probably why it's naff :p Anyway it's personal opinion. However speaking from a programming end all the problems I ever had hosting was with insecure wordpress plugins. Once I stopped hosting them years ago it freed me up. I have an advertising agency and one of the things we do is design bespoke websites for people who want systems that are unique and powerful - both of which wordpress aren't and clients have been more and more ditching it for their own looks. I guess some people love it - I'm just saying I think you're better off designing (or getting designed) your own system. You can be faster, more reliable, and prettier.
     
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  18. dee

    dee Well-Known Member Acorn Supporter

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    Cheers for the comments. This is why I asked in the first place. Ive always found wordpress slow and a bit of a bodge. Not that im capable of rolling my own, unless its a static html/css
     
  19. accelerator United Kingdom

    accelerator Well-Known Member

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    The big advantage of Wordpress is that the CMS provides a very quick way to make updates to the site. This is particularly useful when you have a customer that needs to make updates, because you can just give them a log in and let them do it.

    If it is going to be a very static site, then you could go old school and do it yourself. The advantage here is you can make a very light and fast site, but it can be a pain to make site wide changes.
     
  20. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    If you structure the site very, very carefully, you can use a multi-file search and replace tool to make global changes.

    For example, if the navigation HTML code is identical across hundreds of pages, you can change one page worth of code to incorporate whatever updates you want, then cut and paste the changed HTML into the search and replace tool and update every other page the same.

    It does require a huge amount of discipline, though, to make sure every instance of repeated code is absolutely identical at all times.
     
  21. RobM

    RobM Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    You know if you make the page a .php page on a server that runs php you can then just include another page? Any changes you make to that will be changed across every page including it.
    Eg renaming your index.html to index.php will still be the same but wherever you want you can just type <?php include 'myfile.html'; ?> and whatever is in that file will be put in its place