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.org.uk and .uk

Discussion in '.UK Domain Name Consultations' started by retired_member33, Nov 23, 2013.

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  1. invincible

    invincible Well-Known Member

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    [snipped]

    You posted similar elsewhere and I replied with how it doesn't matter because in my opinion it's still the last choice. :) We need to revisit your opinion in a couple of years because otherwise it is speculation. We'll have the pleasure of seeing how well .uk does and where it falls in respect of .co.uk by this time next year.




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  2. Domain Forum

    Acorn Domains Elite Member

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    articles.co.uk
     
  3. anthony United Kingdom

    anthony Well-Known Member

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    3+10(guess)+1+2=16

    That's an Adlington piss drop in a swimming pool!

    I do remember the rounds of applause from us all for those doing a similar exercise for the LLs, on that occasion it was nabbing TM rights to acquire a good domain. Nominet were more than happy to vet rights on that occasion (via a 3rd party), seems they've forgotten such an option this time around. If it proved to be a questionable process (as it did), then it was up to Nominet to resolve said process (whatever that may be) on this occasion.

    http://www.acorndomains.co.uk/whois/87135-questioning-registered-rights-tm-stage.html

    As I've said, the time stamp arguement is a crap but convenient one, but if Nominet feel it is too difficult for them :rolleyes: then so be it.
     
  4. invincible

    invincible Well-Known Member

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    Would be great to get a statistic from Nominet of how many non .co.uk domain names were transferred between v1 publication and final v3 announcement and how many of those were registered prior to the matching .co.uk. That might go most of the way to demonstrate the level of speculation that occurred.
     
  5. anthony United Kingdom

    anthony Well-Known Member

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    I agree.
     
  6. Systreg Ireland

    Systreg Well-Known Member

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    @ Invincible, that's your point of view, I guess we'll see what happens as time goes by, but regardless of what your opinion is, the pricing or the org.uk's I'm keeping doesn't change, in my opinion nothing has changed with the placings :)
     
  7. invincible

    invincible Well-Known Member

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    We shall see shan't we! :) Everyone make a note to return to this thread in a couple of years.
     
  8. Systreg Ireland

    Systreg Well-Known Member

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    Please do, but no matter what happens, nothing changes for me :)
     
  9. invincible

    invincible Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what you "own" or your "means" but it interested me the day .uk v1 was announced 13 months ago how a certain longstanding domain name investor started ramping up his "for sale" posts on this forum. I certainly believe that the past 13 months put the willies up some members here! Unfortunately nobody can reliably predict what might happen to the value of individual non .co.uk/.uk domain names in the future. All you need to care about is knowing when to get out. :)


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  10. markb United Kingdom

    markb Active Member

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    I ended up paying £2k for a .org.uk domain where I owned the .co.uk but the org.uk was registered beforehand. I did this as a defensive buy. The previous owner of the .org.uk said he had interest in the domain off at least 5 different people all within the space of a few weeks. Looking back, its £2k I didn't need to spend now, but I did what I had to at the time.
     
  11. invincible

    invincible Well-Known Member

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    I was luckier than you with the defensive .org.uk I purchased. The registrant wasn't resolving it and I managed to contact him through external research rather than using snail mail at the address displayed in the WHOIS. After I'd made contact by email he informed me that he'd moved house and hadn't updated the address, thus I knew that if anyone else had written to him it was unlikely that their letter would get delivered. Nethertheless we managed a 24 hour turnaround from contact to transfer. :)


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  12. markb United Kingdom

    markb Active Member

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    I'm presuming you managed to get it at a good price then. The person who I bought the org.uk didn't have a clue why people where interested all of a sudden, but due to the high interest, he was able to get a very good price for his domain.
     
  13. invincible

    invincible Well-Known Member

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    Yes. I bit his arm off although managed not to obviously give the game away. :) He didn't know about .uk. He hadn't resolved the domain name in perhaps a decade and was quite happy to sell.


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  14. philiporchard Croatia

    philiporchard Well-Known Member Acorn Supporter

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    Like many I started buying .org.uk domains to protect the ones I owned and also to take a chance with some others. I wouldn't have done it if the consultation hadn't started, but with 20 new websites, I'm pleased I did.
     
  15. mdb United Kingdom

    mdb Active Member

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    A great thread...

    I sympathise with pretty much if not all of what you say on this thread. The fact that .org.uk registrants have been completely ignored imo is the biggest hole in the announcement, more than the five year sunrise.

    I have a client who had to go for the .org.uk (a small independent tradesman) who had to opt for it when the .co.uk domainer wanted what would have equated to months worth of profit to him. If it had been listed on DL I think it would have fetched low xxx. Ironically the domainer just dropped it so I snapped it up for him. A bit of a rarity.

    But in the same sentiment as above, there are small business owners who are essentially locked out owning the "best" .co.uk because some domainers were / are asking wholly disporporiate asking prices, obviously going on the faith that the domain will mature. All domainers take different views on valuations. It's a shame that with the introduction of .uk, knowing the option that .co.uk registrants have, it offers the .org.uk registrants sod all.

    Well said, the most relevant post on this thread imo. Tell me if I'm wrong, but it looks as though the millions of registrants, who lets face it are the most important stakeholders, have basically been ignored?

    What was the issue with the DPA? Nominet have my email address? They have my mailing address? The DPA would be the best excuse for a cop out I think I've ever heard for something as important as this.

    Yes and no. I agree that they'll definitely play third fiddle and become the least desirable option, but they're already the least desirable between .co.uk, and as .co.uk will essentially equate to the .uk, I don't see how much will change? I can't imagine domainers would split a .co.uk / .uk package... so for peeps who for whatever reason don't have the .co.uk / .uk, the .org.uk will continue be a next best, logical option.

    I think the only thing that would affect .org.uk going forward is if Google alter how they're treated in the SERPs for commercial entities. Guessing how many of these websites exist I can't see them doing anything drastic in this dept.

    For all my arguments over the past couple of days, I think it's fair that the .uk go to the .co.uk registrant if it HAD to go to one or other. Obviously I think there should have been better options for the lowly .org.uk registrant :) Well there should have better options for everyone, but I'll stop banging that drum.

    +1 to that whole post.
     
  16. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Nominet's V3 solution "protects" 96% of their existing registrant base outright. Everything we're discussing here relates to the last 4% of whom half will be disappointed. Except that as Stephen posted, from his testing about 30% of .org.uk holders also own the matching .uk.

    So in practice we're talking about 98.6% of all registrants getting the .uk (though some effectively needed 2 extensions to get it)

    So while it's fine to argue the toss about the last 1.4%, we shouldn't lose sight of the fact that "virtually all" existing registrants are protected by V3. From that point of view, it's a good solution with a few inevitable exceptions - not the disaster being portrayed by the tone of many of the posts on this thread.
     
  17. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Also, the way the October 28 cutoff date works, there's no point in anyone rushing in to squat on existing .org.uk with no matching .co.uk (which is the case for most non-generic .org.uk domains) since doing so won't create any rights to the .uk.
     
  18. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Finally, there are about 100,000 .me.uk owners, virtually all of whom "lose" the who gets the .uk test. But they already figure in the total number of problem cases, which knocks the number of "real" problem cases down much, much further, to well under 1% of all registrations.

    Just trying to make sure this discussion keeps things in perspective.
     
  19. Edwin

    Edwin Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    Let's recast the above into a more familiar form... All it takes is changing a few words for the point to instantly collapse.

    "But in the same sentiment as above, there are small business owners who are essentially locked out of owning the "best" commercial property in central London because some developers were / are asking wholly disproportionate asking prices, obviously going on the faith that the land will mature."

    Why are domains magically a different class of asset, for which the laws of supply and demand need not apply?
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013
  20. Systreg Ireland

    Systreg Well-Known Member

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    I've just been through all the domains in my Nominet account, and I own 109 .org.uk's, of those, I own the matching .co.uk and .org.uk in 18 (19.62%) of those instances.
     
  21. aZooZa

    aZooZa Well-Known Member Exclusive Member

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    I truly feel sorry for you Edwin. You're diligently flogging a lot of dead horses all the time; or at best leading them to water in the hope that they might drink.

    Hopefully the penny will drop soon regarding these constant and irrelevant comparisons people are making.
     
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